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Red Ribbon Week 2018 (October 22nd-26th) Activities and Photos- Methuen Public Schools

posted Oct 4, 2018, 10:15 AM by Kevin Hatch   [ updated Oct 18, 2018, 4:51 PM ]

We will be updating this page as additional information is provided. Please check back often.

Tenney Grammar School activities

MHS SADD Red Ribbon Week

MHS SADD Red Ribbon Week 


Monday,  October 22nd

  •  (Prior to Monday) Front window and library window decorated with a large banner
  • Facts displayed on tv’s
  • Daily morning announcement from SADD leader
  • Sell Raffle tickets(raffle with gift cards, sadd shirt and other goodies) at lunch
  • Lunch time-Bracelets with raffle ticket purchase
  • Red Ribbon t-shirts for sale(will be available to order in weeks prior)
  • Red Ribbon pins distributed to faculty, staff and students

Tuesday, October 23rd
  • Daily morning announcement from SADD leader
  • Facts displayed on tv’s
  • Sell Raffle tickets(raffle with gift cards, SADD shirt, and other goodies) at lunch
  • Bracelets with raffle ticket purchase
  • Red Ribbon t-shirts for sale(will be available to order in weeks prior)

Wednesday, October 24th- Wear Red Day
  • Facts displayed on tv’s
  • Student created connections lesson plan-Video
  • Daily morning announcement from SADD leader
  • Sell Raffle tickets(raffle with gift cards, SADD shirt, and other goodies) at lunch
  • Bracelets with raffle ticket purchase
  • Red Ribbon t-shirts for sale(will be available to order in weeks prior)
  • PM Activity: Spaghetti dinner catered by Bada Bing. Cheryl Pushee will speak to district-wide guests about the loss of her son to opiate addiction. Pictures and presentation. SADD leadership team speaks. 

Thursday, October 25th
  • Daily morning announcement from SADD leader
  • Facts displayed on tv’s
  • Sell Raffle tickets(raffle with gift cards, SADD shirt, and other goodies) at lunch
  • Bracelets with raffle ticket purchase
  • Red Ribbon t-shirts for sale(will be available to order in weeks prior)

Friday, October 26th
  • Daily morning announcement from SADD leader
  • Facts displayed on tv’s
  • Sell Raffle tickets(raffle with gift cards, SADD shirt, and other goodies) at lunch
  • Bracelets with raffle ticket purchase
  • Red Ribbon t-shirts for sale(will be available to order in weeks prior)
  • End of the day-Red ribbon week raffle winner is announced!



Marsh Grammar School Activities

Marsh Grammar School Activities

The Marsh will be celebrating Red Ribbon Week from October 22nd - 26th. Red Ribbon Week is an alcohol, tobacco, and other drug and violence prevention awareness campaign observed annually in October in the United States. For the past several years, the entire Marsh Grammar School has participated in Red Ribbon Week activities to show support for this very important cause. For new staff, your participation is voluntary and the type of information discussed in your classrooms really depends on the age of your students and what you deem appropriate. The websites below are helpful resources you may choose to visit to gain some insight into the initiative. This is a fabulous opportunity to unite both the upper and lower school for a great cause. 
http://redribbon.org
https://www.sadd.org
https://www.dea.gov/kiki-and-history-red-ribbon-week

The theme for the 2018 Red Ribbon Week is "Life is your journey, travel drug-free!" Students may decorate their homeroom door using this year's theme or their own idea that portrays positive decision making, anti-vapinganti-drug, etc. Also, students are welcome to create their own posters for Red Ribbon Week which can be posted outside classrooms.

If you have questions, please let us know.

Thanks,
Stacey Zraket (Upper School SADD Advisor) &
Devin Deveau (Upper School Health Teacher)


 Monday, October 22nd
  • Discuss Red Ribbon Week with your students.
  • Begin Decorating Homeroom Doors 

 Tuesday, October 23rd
  • Students in SADD will decorate the entire building with inspirational quotes.
Wednesday, October 24th
  • Students and staff should wear red to show their support of Red Ribbon Week. This is a district-wide spirit day!

 Friday, October 26th

  • The administration will judge the decorated doors and announce winners!


Vaporized :Youth and young adult exposure to e-cigarette information.

posted Sep 28, 2018, 9:20 AM by Kevin Hatch   [ updated Sep 28, 2018, 9:32 AM ]

Please use your mouse to scroll through the document.

Facts About Spice/ K2 (Synthetic Marijuana)

posted Aug 23, 2018, 9:49 AM by Kevin Hatch   [ updated Aug 23, 2018, 9:56 AM ]


THE PHYSIOLOGY OF ADDICTION Effects of Drug-Taking Behavior on the Brain Ruth A. Potee, MD

posted Jun 11, 2018, 9:02 AM by Kevin Hatch   [ updated Jun 11, 2018, 9:03 AM ]


Resources for Alcoholics and Problem Drinkers

posted May 20, 2018, 2:44 PM by Kevin Hatch

Resources for Alcoholics and Problem Drinkers

Alcoholism/Alcohol Use Disorder

  • Alcoholism is no longer the preferred term for alcohol abuse or addiction. Instead, it is now known as alcohol use disorder (AUD). This disorder affects approximately 16 million people in the United States, more than 6 percent of the population, and includes every race, religion and ethnicity.

  • While more men than women suffer from AUD, women actually face greater health risks. Not only can drinking during pregnancy cause permanent damage to the fetus, but AUD can increase the rate of breast cancer, heart and liver disease in females.

  • Health risks for both genders due to AUD include increased risk for accidents, assaults, hypertension, cognitive disorders, risky sexual behaviors and various types of cancers. AUD can shorten a person’s lifespan by decades. It is a serious public health problem as well as a personal one.

NIAAA

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism has a great description of the medical diagnosis of AUD.

Mayo Clinic

Alcohol use disorder as explained by the Mayo Clinic complete with advice for receiving care.

APA

The American Psychological Association explains alcohol use disorders and their treatment.

Cleveland Clinic

The Cleveland Clinic's Center for Continuing Education has a large section detailing Alcohol Use Disorders.

AAFP

American Family Physician information on medications for alcohol use disorder.

Authorities on Alcoholism

  • It is crucial to seek help or information from authorities on alcoholism, as they are the gold standard. These organizations have the latest treatment information available as well as up-to-date statistics on the most successful treatment options. They refer to well-conducted studies for their data, so give you the best resources in your own quest in finding the best types of treatment and rehabilitation for yourself or a loved one. Seeking information from non-authoritative sources can lead to missteps in the path to AUD recovery, costing you both time, money and health.

  • Take a look at these authorities on alcoholism for a wealth of information on signs, treatment and more:

NIH

The National Institutes of Health is a medical research agency division of the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services.

AAAP

The American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry is a professional organization dedicated to sharing of research and clinical treatment.

APA

The American Psychological Association uses psychology to benefits people's lives.

ASAM

American Society of Addiction Medicine is a membership organization for education and advocacy of addiction.

NAADAC

NAADAC is the association and one of the accrediting bodies for addiction professionals.

NASW

The National Associaion for Social Workers provides resources for social workers who deal with alcoholics.

NIAAA

Rethinking Drinking is a helpful site provided by the NIAAA for those thinking about making a change to their health.

Free Alcoholism Resources

  • Getting help for alcoholism doesn’t always have to cost money, and these free resources can be used alone or in combination with other treatment options for lasting recovery.

  • Self-help groups like Alcoholics Anonymous exist for the alcoholic, and other groups like Al-Anon Family Groups are there for the family and friends of alcoholics. If you are looking for a free treatment finder or other resources, take a look at the SAMHSA site.

Alcoholics Anonymous

Alcoholics Anonymous is the longest running 'anonymous' program and welcomes pill addicts who are also addicted to alcohol.

SAMHSA

SAMHSA has a free treatment finder and other tools for those looking for help with their addiction.

Al-Anon

Find free meetings and helpful resources for family and friends of alcoholics.

SMART Recovery

Program that offers meetings, tools and books as an alternative to alcohol treatment.

Cocaine Anonymous

Cocaine Anonymous is a 12-step support group for those addicted to cocaine and all other mind-altering substances.

Narcotics Anonymous

Narcotics Anonymous is a worldwide organization providing tools for a better way of life for those addicted to narcotic substances.

Statistics on Alcoholism

According to 2015 study by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), nearly 27 percent of people aged 18 and up reported they had engaged in binge drinking – defined as consumption of four drinks for women and five drinks for men in a two-hour period -in the previous month.

Excess alcohol use kills about 88,000 people per year. Approximately 4,300 of those deaths occurred in people under the age of 21, the legal drinking age.

Ten percent of U.S. children live with an parent suffering from AUD.

AUD results in approximately $249 billion per year in lost economic productivity, an average of $2.05 per drink. More than 75 percent of these costs relate to binge drinking.

Genetics plays a role in AUD, making up about half of risk factors. That does not mean that just because someone has a family history of AUD that they will experience a drinking problem, but it is something for such people to take into consideration if they decide to drink.

Alcohol and Substance Abuse at Work

  • Alcohol and substance abuse at work can cost a person their job and jeopardize future employment. This behavior also costs employers millions of dollars annually in lost time and productivity.
  • In some cases, people with AUD may fall under Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) protection. That is not true of those who use illegal drugs while on the job. According to the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights division, an alcoholic is protected under ADA is they are qualified to perform a job’s essential functions. However, an employer may “discipline, discharge or deny employment” to a person whose alcohol use adversely affects either their job performance or their conduct. Employers can prohibit workplace alcohol use and require that workers not be under the influence of alcohol while working.

Here are some important resources for employers and employees:

OPM

The Office of Personnel Management provides a supervisor handbook to deal with alcoholism in the workplace.

Know your rights

SAMSHA resource detailing your workplace rights to protect you from discrimination for your alcohol or drug problem.

Campus Alcoholism Resources

Many young adults begin drinking seriously while at college, even though they are under the legal drinking age. A campus “party” atmosphere and the lack of parental authority can lead to binge drinking and terrible consequences. Most parents have heard of deaths occurring on college campuses because of excessive drinking. Sexual assault is more likely when one or both parties are drunk. So are deaths or severe injuries from motor vehicle or other accidents. Roughly 25 percent of students report academic consequences due to drinking, and fully 20 percent of college students meet AUD criteria.

Fortunately, colleges and universities are finally coming to terms with the frequency and dangers of drinking on campus. Some schools are eliminating or severely restricting the activities of fraternities, as Greek life tends toward a hotbed of drinking culture. While campus resources to combat AUD vary by school, most colleges offer programs helping students struggling with the disease either on-campus or through off-campus professional services. They may also offer specific sober recreational and social activities to keep students engaged and away from alcohol. Check with your student’s college health department to see what services a specific school offers.

Here are some helpful resources from colleges around the U.S.:

Dartmouth

Collaborative effort of multiple schools on the Dartmouth campus to address alcohol, tobacco, and other related drug issues.

Daytona State

Daytona State College offers individual counseling for addiction issues and community resources.

Lake Superior College

Tri-campus Community Coalition on Student Drinking addresses dangerous student use of alcohol.

Resources for Parents

  • Seeing your child struggling with AUD is heartbreaking, and you may not know where to turn. In teenagers, drinking is often used as a method of self-medication to deal with mental and emotional issues. The NAIAA estimates that 623,000 young people ages 12 to 17 suffer from AUD. Nearly half of all teenagers report being drunk at least once by their senior year. Not only does teen drinking affect a child’s development but may pave the way for AUD in adulthood.
  • It is essential that parents talk to their children about drinking and become good role models. Don’t fool yourself with “not my child” syndrome – any child can develop AUD. Monitor your child’s behavior and know who their friends are. If there is a history of alcoholism in your family, let your children know they are at greater risk and may never be able to drink normally.
  • Some high schools may offer resources for teens with drinking problems. Other resources include your local hospital, as well as therapists and counselors specializing in teenage alcohol and drug abuse. Don’t wait until your teenager’s drinking develops in full-fledged AUD. Seek help and intervention as soon as possible.

Here are some helpful sites with information for parents and caregivers:

Teen Mental Health

This website helps teens as they transition in school, giving them tips on topics such as time management and mental health.

Teen Health

Site dedicated to helping teens be healthy and deal with changes in their body, mind and emotions.

What Works 4 U

This site has a helpline, a share center and a place to share and learn from others what works for them with their mental health.

AACAP

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry website has lots of sections, this one is about teens and alcohol and other drugs.

NIDA for Teens

The National Institute for Drug Abuse has a whole section for parents of teens, with videos, scientific facts and more.

SAHM

The Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine has a site dedicated to providing information, along with membership for professionals in the field.

Family Doctor

This website, operated by the American Academy of Family Physicians, provides scientifically accurate information from a family medicine perspective.

Stop Alcohol Abuse

Provides research and information on prevention, as well as videos specifically designed for college-bound youth

Healthy Children

Sponsored by the American Academy of Pediatrics, this website provides resources for treatment for drug and alcohol abuse for teens.

Top Ten Tips for Getting Help for Yourself or a Loved One

Whether you or a loved are affected by AUD, it’s important to get help. Here are some basic do’s and don’ts:

  • Accept the fact that you or your loved one has a problem with alcohol. Denial is not a solution.
  • Learn about AUD and its signs and symptoms.
  • Contact an alcohol treatment center or therapist.
  • Avoid people who may tempt you to drink. This may involve forging new social priorities and connections.
  • If the problem involves a loved one, don’t become an enabler or a co-dependent.
  • Do not try to talk to a loved one about alcoholism treatment options when they are drunk. Wait until they are sober, or at least not deeply under the influence.
  • Do not drink around a loved one with an alcohol issue.
  • Do not provide your loved one with money unless it is for treatment.
  • Do not shame or scold your loved one. This is not helpful.
  • If your loved one refuses to face the reality of their AUD, discuss staging an intervention with a counselor and family members and close friends.

Alcoholism can ruin a person’s life and cause great harm to their family. However, there are millions of people who undergo treatment for alcoholism and never drink again. The sooner a person drinking to excess, or their loved ones, seek information and treatment, the better the possible outcome. Do not let shame stop you from seeking help. People from every walk of life have struggled with AUD, and most will win their battle. There is no cure for AUD, but there are countless examples of recovering alcoholics who lead active, fulfilling, sober lives. Resources are available. Don’t despair, and never give up.

Substance Abuse Resource Guide Submitted by a student from Methuen Public Schools

posted Apr 23, 2018, 9:05 AM by Kevin Hatch

 Submitted by a student from Methuen public schools while researching this topic. 


Substance Abuse Resource Guide | University of Arizona

No one is immune to the risks of using drugs and alcohol. Although alcohol is legal for adults, many people of different ages experience problems from overusing and abusing alcohol. Substance abuse includes alcohol and drugs of both the illegal and prescription variety. Learning about the dangers of substance abuse early can help you avoid dangerous mistakes that could impact your health for the rest of your life.

Drugs
When talking about drugs, it’s common for people to immediately think about illegal drugs such as heroin, cocaine, and marijuana. Although these drugs are dangerous and should be avoided, there are also other types of drugs to consider. Prescription medications are common for people who have health issues or problems with recurring pain. Although these medications are helpful when a doctor prescribes them and the patient uses them correctly, they can be dangerous if they are abused. Some people use these drugs when a doctor has not prescribed them, or they use the drugs for a longer period of time or in greater amounts than they’re supposed to. If this happens, dangerous addiction can occur.

  • Preventing Drug Use(PDF): Everyone has some risk of developing a drug addiction, but some people’s situations make them more likely to have problems with addiction.
  • A Prescription for Pain (PDF): Doctors sometimes prescribe prescription medication for pain, but some people have problems because they take these medications when they don’t need them.
  • Tips for Parents on Keeping Kids Drug-Free (PDF): The younger a person is at the time of drug experimentation, the more likely it is that they will go on to have problems with drugs.
  • Child’s First Eight Years Critical for Substance Abuse Prevention: Being healthy and strong while you’re a child helps you avoid drugs and alcohol when you get to your teen years.
  • Warning Signs: Someone struggling with drugs will usually show warning signs such as problems in school and unusual mood changes.
  • Drug Prevention for Teens (PDF): Dangerous drugs can be street substances such as marijuana or medications that people keep in their medicine cabinets.
  • Preventing Drug Abuse: Not using drugs in the first place is the best defense against developing a problem with these dangerous substances.
  • Preventing Teen Abuse of Prescription Drugs: Fact Sheet (PDF): Using pain relievers or stimulant medications in ways that are different from how they are prescribed can be dangerous and even life-threatening.
  • True Stories: Reading true stories about people who have misused drugs can be a sobering way to learn about their dangers.
  • Raising Drug-Free Children: Parents can help their kids avoid drug addiction by setting a positive example, setting clear expectations, and being involved with daily activities.
  • Raising Drug-Free Kids: Advice by Age (PDF): It’s important to have open communication between parents and kids so kids can ask questions about drugs and alcohol to learn about the risks.
  • Information About Amphetamines: Amphetamines are stimulant drugs that people use to stay awake or feel more energetic.
  • Keep Your Kids Drug-Free This Summer: Kids need to be active over the summer so they don’t feel tempted to experiment with drugs. Working at a part-time job or participating in extracurricular activities are good ways to stay busy.
  • Prescription Drug Misuse/Abuse and Your Kids: Kids who need to take prescription drugs for a health issue need to have their parents keep track of and dispense their medications for safety.
  • Protect Your Kids! Prescription Drug Alert: It’s common for people to think that prescription medication is safer than street drugs; however, these medicines are often just as powerful and dangerous.
  • Club Drugs: Club drugs are drugs that affect the central nervous system, which can have a big impact on the way people behave.
  • Raising Awareness of Opioid Addiction (video): Watch this video to hear people with drug problems share their stories.
  • Marijuana Myths and Facts (PDF): Many people think that marijuana is harmless, but this drug can have a negative effect on how people think and concentrate.
  • Live Above the Influence: Take this quiz to see how strong you might be if you are in a situation where someone offers you drugs.
  • Bath Salts: Bath salts are powders that some people misuse dangerously to feel more energetic.
  • A Brief History of Methamphetamine: Methamphetamine is a stimulant that people abuse to give them more energy and to stay awake.
  • Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention: Abusing prescription drugs can result in addiction and even dangerous overdoses.

Alcohol
Alcohol is a common part of society, and many adults engage in social drinking. Although drinking alcohol is a legal activity for people older than 21, there are several issues that make alcohol potentially dangerous. First, many people under 21 drink alcohol, even though this is illegal. Underage alcohol consumption is dangerous for young people because alcohol can be more harmful to kids’ health. Drinking alcohol can also lead to accidents and other dangerous situations. Adults also need to be careful about how often and how much alcohol they consume because alcohol addiction is common and harmful.

No one is immune to the risks of using drugs and alcohol. Although alcohol is legal for adults, many people of different ages experience problems from overusing and abusing alcohol. Substance abuse includes alcohol and drugs of both the illegal and prescription variety. Learning about the dangers of substance abuse early can help you avoid dangerous mistakes that could impact your health for the rest of your life.

Drugs
When talking about drugs, it’s common for people to immediately think about illegal drugs such as heroin, cocaine, and marijuana. Although these drugs are dangerous and should be avoided, there are also other types of drugs to consider. Prescription medications are common for people who have health issues or problems with recurring pain. Although these medications are helpful when a doctor prescribes them and the patient uses them correctly, they can be dangerous if they are abused. Some people use these drugs when a doctor has not prescribed them, or they use the drugs for a longer period of time or in greater amounts than they’re supposed to. If this happens, dangerous addiction can occur.

  • Preventing Drug Use(PDF): Everyone has some risk of developing a drug addiction, but some people’s situations make them more likely to have problems with addiction.
  • A Prescription for Pain (PDF): Doctors sometimes prescribe prescription medication for pain, but some people have problems because they take these medications when they don’t need them.
  • Tips for Parents on Keeping Kids Drug-Free (PDF): The younger a person is at the time of drug experimentation, the more likely it is that they will go on to have problems with drugs.
  • Child’s First Eight Years Critical for Substance Abuse Prevention: Being healthy and strong while you’re a child helps you avoid drugs and alcohol when you get to your teen years.
  • Warning Signs: Someone struggling with drugs will usually show warning signs such as problems in school and unusual mood changes.
  • Drug Prevention for Teens (PDF): Dangerous drugs can be street substances such as marijuana or medications that people keep in their medicine cabinets.
  • Preventing Drug Abuse: Not using drugs in the first place is the best defense against developing a problem with these dangerous substances.
  • Preventing Teen Abuse of Prescription Drugs: Fact Sheet (PDF): Using pain relievers or stimulant medications in ways that are different from how they are prescribed can be dangerous and even life-threatening.
  • True Stories: Reading true stories about people who have misused drugs can be a sobering way to learn about their dangers.
  • Raising Drug-Free Children: Parents can help their kids avoid drug addiction by setting a positive example, setting clear expectations, and being involved with daily activities.
  • Raising Drug-Free Kids: Advice by Age (PDF): It’s important to have open communication between parents and kids so kids can ask questions about drugs and alcohol to learn about the risks.
  • Information About Amphetamines: Amphetamines are stimulant drugs that people use to stay awake or feel more energetic.
  • Keep Your Kids Drug-Free This Summer: Kids need to be active over the summer so they don’t feel tempted to experiment with drugs. Working at a part-time job or participating in extracurricular activities are good ways to stay busy.
  • Prescription Drug Misuse/Abuse and Your Kids: Kids who need to take prescription drugs for a health issue need to have their parents keep track of and dispense their medications for safety.
  • Protect Your Kids! Prescription Drug Alert: It’s common for people to think that prescription medication is safer than street drugs; however, these medicines are often just as powerful and dangerous.
  • Club Drugs: Club drugs are drugs that affect the central nervous system, which can have a big impact on the way people behave.
  • Raising Awareness of Opioid Addiction (video): Watch this video to hear people with drug problems share their stories.
  • Marijuana Myths and Facts (PDF): Many people think that marijuana is harmless, but this drug can have a negative effect on how people think and concentrate.
  • Live Above the Influence: Take this quiz to see how strong you might be if you are in a situation where someone offers you drugs.
  • Bath Salts: Bath salts are powders that some people misuse dangerously to feel more energetic.
  • A Brief History of Methamphetamine: Methamphetamine is a stimulant that people abuse to give them more energy and to stay awake.
  • Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention: Abusing prescription drugs can result in addiction and even dangerous overdoses.

Alcohol
Alcohol is a common part of society, and many adults engage in social drinking. Although drinking alcohol is a legal activity for people older than 21, there are several issues that make alcohol potentially dangerous. First, many people under 21 drink alcohol, even though this is illegal. Underage alcohol consumption is dangerous for young people because alcohol can be more harmful to kids’ health. Drinking alcohol can also lead to accidents and other dangerous situations. Adults also need to be careful about how often and how much alcohol they consume because alcohol addiction is common and harmful.

Upcoming SADD District Wide Bowling Event Thursday., May 3rd 2018 (Updated address)

posted Apr 9, 2018, 1:14 PM by Kevin Hatch   [ updated Apr 16, 2018, 8:58 AM ]

District-Wide SADD Bowling Night
When: Thursday, May 3, 2018
What Time? S:30•7:30pm
Where? Academy Lanes 725 South Main Street, Bradford MA 01835 
Who? All S.A.D.D. membership 
Price? Bowling and shoe rental are FREEi! Don't forget to bring socks!
students must arrange own transportation. Pick up time is 7:30 sharp please.

All About Fentanyl, the Drug That Killed Prince and Tom Petty — and Is Sweeping the U.S.

posted Feb 6, 2018, 8:57 AM by Kevin Hatch   [ updated Feb 6, 2018, 8:57 AM ]

All About Fentanyl, the Drug That Killed Prince and Tom Petty — and Is Sweeping the U.S.
People

Tom Petty‘s Oct. 2 death has been officially ruled as an accidental overdose due to taking several pain medications including Fentanyl, the same opiate that was the cause of Prince‘s death on April 21. While fentanyl may not be as immediately familiar to many people as more commonly cited drugs like Percocet or Oxycontin, addiction expert and founder of Origins Behavioral Healthcare, Ben Levenson, told PEOPLE the extremely powerful, synthetic opiate isn’t uncommon. Explaining what exactly the Read the full story

Upcoming Events For January, 2018

posted Jan 11, 2018, 1:38 PM by Kevin Hatch

Upcoming Events For January, 2018
1. Methuen Police Department Community Outreach : Cole Welch at Marsh Grammar School
2. Mike Gorman  motivational speaker at Tenney Grammar School

What to Look for — and What to Avoid — when Searching for an Addiction Treatment Program Partnership for Drug-Free Kids

posted Jan 7, 2018, 10:45 AM by Kevin Hatch

What to Look for — and What to Avoid — when Searching for an Addiction Treatment Program


The current opioid epidemic has unfortunately bred a slew of unethical businesses posing as legitimate addiction treatment for those struggling with drugs or alcohol. It’s unimaginable that there are those who would take advantage of families in crisis, but it’s a sad reality.

The stigma of addiction and the fear of being judged will often have families wait until the last minute to reach out for help. They often feel terrified, alone and desperate to find help for their loved one. Some providers will strategically prey upon this fear to get a young person into their so-called treatment program. For many families, this predatory behavior will seem to be a gift, a kind and compassionate stranger who can answer all their prayers.

You are your child’s best advocate for finding the right type of treatment. Even well-meaning healthcare professionals or other individuals in your life may inadvertently point you in the wrong direction simply because addiction treatment is not their area of expertise.

Your family’s journey to recovery will be an ongoing learning process — and figuring out how to navigate the treatment system can be one of the biggest challenges. Do your research, ask for help, network with other parents, talk to addictions counselors and don’t be shy about asking any prospective providers a lot of questions.

It’s recommended that you start with a trusted addictions counselor and not with an online search. Use the following as a quick reference guide to help form the questions you’ll ask and quickly eliminate any questionable providers from your list:


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